Success Profile: Dr. Cruz Caridad Bueno, Visiting Assistant Professor of Black Studies at SUNY-New Paltz

Walker’s Legacy Profiles recognize unique women of color in business that embody the legacy of Madam C.J. Walker, the first female self-made millionaire. In this installment, meet Dr. Cruz Caridad Bueno.


Who is she? Dr. Cruz Bueno is an anti-racist feminist economist. She holds a Ph.D. in economics from the University of Massachusetts-Amherst. She is currently a Visiting Assistant Professor of Black Studies at SUNY-New Paltz and is on academic leave from the Economics Department at Siena College.

My first job was as an Assistant Professor of Economics at Siena College

Focus on love, life, and happiness…work is always there, but if there is love and laughter, work flows and success follows.

The biggest inspiration behind my career has been dedicated to producing cutting-edge research that addresses issues of racial and gender inequality, and especially, the intersection of racial and gender discrimination. My work is oriented towards public policy and at the heart is my commitment to empowering women of color.

One professional thing I would change about my career in my twenties is that I wish I would have reached out more frequently and consistently to more feminist economists in my area of research, especially women of color. There are amazing female economists of color such as Dr. Cecilia Conrad, Dr. Marie T. Mora, Dr. Rhonda Sharpe, Dr. Sue Stockley, Dr. Nina Banks,  and Dr. Carmen Diana Deere that are trailblazers and always have been so supportive of my work and success.  

What are your thoughts on women of color in business? Black women have been the back of the U.S. economy since it’s inception and moreover, the backbone of global capitalist development with beginnings of the slave trade. Today, women of color comprise the largest percentage of new entrepreneurs and that speaks volumes to our creativity and endurance. I am so excited about initiatives such as Walker’s Legacy, which empowers women  of color in business and fosters community amongst us.

“Your thoughts about women of color in business: Black women have been the back of the U.S. economy since it’s inception and moreover, the backbone of global capitalist development with beginnings of the slave trade.

Today, women of color comprise the largest percentage of new entrepreneurs and that speaks volumes to our creativity and endurance. I am so excited about initiatives such as Walker’s Legacy, which empowers women  of color in business and fosters community amongst us.

The woman that serves as my greatest source of inspiration is Ida B. Wells-Barnett

Two staple items you must have for a power meeting or networking event are MAC red lipstick and heels

My favorite vacation spot is Dingle, Ireland and Paris

What was your inspiration for going into your profession? I was inspired to join the Black Studies Department at SUNY-New Paltz because I wanted to apply my training as an economist to issues that people of color experience in the United States. As a Black Latina economist, I am well aware of the systemic and institutional racism that we experience in a market economy and I wanted to expose my students to the ability to apply economics to the important pressing economic and social issues our communities face.

Christine Nbemeneh

Christine Nbemeneh

Christine is an aspiring lawyer and news writer majoring in Government and Public Relations at University of Texas, Austin. On campus, she is an advocate for educational equity and entrepreneurship.

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